Author Archives: Greg Mc

Free and Worth Every Cent

I took a run at Tweriod to see what the user on-line profile looked like for our GeekHealth Twitter followers. After authorizing Tweriod to access our Twitter account, the web site told me to wait for up to an hour for the results to be compiled. I was optimistic that it would take less than an hour, since we have a pretty small, fairly new following. I was wrong. It took over an hour for Tweriod to analyze the 1412 followers on our account, and compile a report.

Upon receiving the notification email, I logged back into Tweriod and pulled up the stats. It turns out that most of our followers are online between 6am and 5pm, and this is when we should send out tweets for the most impact.

tweriod1

That’s some meaningful insight! In a slightly more granular view, there were specific hours when we could have more impact. Apparently geeks only read tweets when they’re at their computers, working, not during their lunch break, or when they’re sneaking an afternoon snack.

tweriod2

There may be more value in the Premium version, but I can get excited over the free demo.

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Filed under 2013 - Post 3, Analytics

Taking Root with SproutSocial

I recently added SproutSocial (www.sproutsocial.com) to the analytic tools that we’re using on the GeekHealth social media effort, tracking both our facebook and Twitter profiles. SproutSocial has a full catalog of account management and media penetration tools, including Inbox services, real-time brand monitoring, publishing services, and metric reporting.

From my view, the content publishing services (including rich mobile tools) are a major value point. Under the SproutSocial interface, you can prepare content and either publish it immediately to any or all of your profiles or schedule the release for a furture time. In the most advanced mode, SproutSocial will help you to release the content at the “sweet spot” of time, based on market analytics gathered on your behalf. Given time to develop patterns, I believe that this service could help to pivot our publishing efforts into a much more widely-read media source.

On the inbound side, SproutSocial provides a mailbox aggregator, consolidating your profiles into a single interface. ImageYou can view / review email and tweets from all of your sites in one pane, helping you to avoid neglecting any of your followers. The mail panel provides message threading as well as easy access to more information about your contacts.

My first glance at the metrics provided a surprising insight. Although I typically imagine our content being targeted at proto-geek males (age 15 – 50, tech / office workers, gamers, etc.), I was surprised to find that our audience thus far is very slightly weighted to the female side. This is despite the predominently male composition of the TMMBA class (our “seed” audience). In additon, we have managed to outgrow our specific region, with a portion of our audience spread around the globe.Image

Overall, I am impressed with the initial data captured by SocialSprout, given the short time that it has had access to our accounts. Configuration of the service was trivial (create an account with SproutSocial, enter the account names and passwords, specify your organization type and time zone).

Now, if I can only figure out how to make it crawl the web and aggregate content…

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Filed under 2013 - Post 2, Analytics

The Anti-Social Media Communications Company??

Based on a Seattle-based business having the identity of:

  • Reinventing local media on multiple platforms
  • Leaders in Multiplatform content and advertising solutions
  • Innovators in the creation and delivery of local content

I expected that I would find engagement in all forms of digital communication. Rather, I may have discovered the last bastion of pure buzzwords and twentieth-century technology.

Fisher Communications is a company comprised of twenty television stations and three radio stations. In addition, they operate multiple media and content provisioning services for other companies. At the parent level, the approach to social media appears to be strict avoidance. From the company web site (http://fsci.com), there are no direct links to Twitter, facebook, Pinterest or RSS feeds. The company appears to have no interest in engaging the public. I can appreciate the desire to not dilute attention from their operating units, but Fisher also provides high-bandwidth fiber optic and satellite communications (Fisher Pathways), streaming media and property leasing (Fisher Plaza Leasing). Even at this level, the company provides no gateway into social media services. I believe that Fisher is missing the opportunity.

Following links into the subordinate companies yields a more liberal proach to media. Large media companies like KOMO (komonews.com) are linked into facebook, Pinterest, Twitter, RSS, IOS and Android Apps. KOMO provides content (Twitter, RSS & Apps), collects information (Twitter) and shares more “static” information and human interest content (facebook, Pinterest). Smaller organizations like KLEW (Lewiston, klewtv.com) provide similar content, but through fewer channels (facebook, Twitter and RSS). At the smallest groups like KUNW (Univision TV in Yakima), the facebook site is their only Internet presence, where Univision shares public interest content in Spanish for their target constituents. Fisher radio interests supplement their terrestrial broadcasting with streaming media.

Whether by inertia or design, the Fisher Communication companies are moving ahead. Fisher Communications seems to be firmly rooted in the past. I believe that Fisher should be coordinating their media efforts at the highest level and providing their subsidiary companies with the tools necessary to be present in social media. Instead, the company is allowing each group to flounder or flourish on their own. In addition, Fisher may be not be reaching the highest-level, highest-performing future employees for their company by ignoring current technologies. From outward appearances, Fisher Communications is truely an anti-social media operation.

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Filed under 2013 - Post 1, Uncategorized